Does "Subpart B - Applicability of Standards" Apply to You?

Subpart B provides the standard, applicability of standards in 29 CFR Part 1910, that provides the general industry standards that are applicable to agricultural operations. They include temporary labor camps, storage and handling of anhydrous ammonia, logging operations, specifications for accident prevention signs and tags, hazard communication, cadmium, and retention of DOT markings, placards and labels.

To identify which general industry standards listed in subpart B apply to you, click on each tab below.

Additional resource information can be found on the agricultural safety and health (ASH) webpage.

Subpart B - Applicability of Standards

Do you have temporary labor camps?

Do you have temporary labor camps?

If yes, then you need to comply with the standard on temporary labor camps. This standard provides requirements for the site (i.e., camps to be adequately drained, of an adequate size), shelter (i.e., construction, seven foot ceilings, sleeping quarters, living quarters, cooking facilities, heating and cooling), water supply (i.e., convenient, water outlets), toilet facilities (i.e., capacity, accessible, location, lighting), sewage disposal facilities, laundry, handwashing and bathing facilities (i.e., ratios, adequate supply of running water, cleanliness), lighting, refuse disposal, construction and operation of kitchens, dining hall, and feeding facilities, first aid, and reporting communicable diseases.  

Do you handle or store anhydrous ammonia?

Do you handle or store anhydrous ammonia?

If yes, then you need to comply with paragraphs (a) and (b) of the storage and handling of anhydrous ammonia standard. It applies to the design, construction, location, installation, and operation of anhydrous ammonia systems including refrigerated ammonia storage systems.  

This standard does not apply to:

  • Ammonia manufacturing plants
  • Refrigeration plants where ammonia is used solely as a refrigerant

Paragraph (a) provides the scope and definitions for the standard. Paragraph (b) provides basic rules such as approval for systems and equipment (i.e., NRTL, ANSI), requirements for construction, original test and requalification of nonrefrigerated containers, marking nonrefrigerated containers, marking refrigerated containers, location of containers, container appurtenances (accessories), hose specifications, piping, tubing, and fittings, charging of containers, safety relief devices, transfer of liquids, tank car unloading points and operations, liquid-level gaging device, and electrical equipment and wiring.

More information on ammonia can be found on our A-Z topics page for ammonia and ammonia refrigeration. Additional related information can be found on our A-Z safety and health topics pages for personal protective equipmentcompressed gases and respiratory protection. Further, assistance with consensus standards can be obtained by contacting the NCDOL Library

Do you have logging operations?

Do you have logging operations?

If yes, then you need to comply with the logging operations standard. It applies to all types of logging, regardless of the end use of the wood. These types of logging include, but are not limited to, pulpwood and timber harvesting and the logging of sawlogs, veneer bolts, poles, pilings and other forest products. This standard does not cover the construction or use of cable yarding systems. Note: Hazards and working conditions not specifically addressed by this standard are covered by other applicable general industry standards. This standard applies to all logging operations as defined below:

Logging operations - Operations associated with felling and moving trees and logs from the stump to the point of delivery, such as, but not limited to, marking danger trees and trees/logs to be cut to length, felling, limbing, bucking, debarking, chipping, yarding, loading, unloading, storing, and transporting machines, equipment and personnel to, from and between logging sites.

This standard provides general requirements (i.e., personal protective equipment, first aid kits, seatbelts, fire extinguishers, electrical lines, flammable liquids, explosives), hand and portable powered tools (i.e., chainsaws), machine use, vehicles, tree harvesting, and employee training. It also references consensus standards incorporated by referenceAppendix A provides a list for first aid kits and appendix B provides an acceptable first aid and CPR training program.

Additional information can be found on the A-Z safety and health topic pages for loggingbloodborne pathogensarboriculturemedical services and first aidmachine guardingflammable liquidselectrical safety, and personal protective equipment. In addition, occupational exposure to hazards encountered in logging falls within the OSH Division logging and arboriculture special emphasis program.

Do you have slow moving vehicles?

Do you have slow moving vehicles?

If yes, then you need to comply with paragraph (d)(10) of the specifications for accident prevention signs and tags standard. Paragraph (d)(10) applies to the specifications for slow moving vehicle signs.

Slow-moving vehicle emblem - This emblem consists of a fluorescent yellow-orange triangle with a dark red reflective border. The yellow-orange fluorescent triangle is a highly visible color for daylight exposure. The reflective border defines the shape of the fluorescent color in daylight and creates a hollow red triangle in the path of motor vehicle headlights at night. The emblem is intended as a unique identification for, and it shall be used only on, vehicles which by design move slowly (25 m.p.h. or less) on the public roads. The emblem is not a clearance marker for wide machinery nor is it intended to replace required lighting or marking of slow-moving vehicles. Neither the color film pattern and its dimensions nor the backing shall be altered to permit use of advertising or other markings. The material, location, mounting, etc., of the emblem shall be in accordance with the American Society of Agricultural Engineers Emblem for Identifying Slow-Moving Vehicles, ASAE R276, 1967, or ASAE S276.2 (ANSI B114.1-1971), which are incorporated by reference.

Additional assistance with consensus standards can be obtained by contacting the NCDOL Library

Do you have employees that may be exposed to any chemical under normal conditions or in foreseeable emergencies?

Do you have employees that may be exposed to any chemical under normal conditions or in foreseeable emergencies?

If yes, then you need to comply with the hazard communication standard. It applies to any chemical which is known to be present in the workplace in such a manner that employees may be exposed under normal conditions of use or in a foreseeable emergency. 

This standard does not apply to:

  • Any hazardous waste as such term is defined by the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, as amended (42 U.S.C. 6901 et seq.), when subject to regulations issued under that Act by the Environmental Protection Agency;
  • Any hazardous substance as such term is defined by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) (42 U.S.C. 9601 et seq.) when the hazardous substance is the focus of remedial or removal action being conducted under CERCLA in accordance with Environmental Protection Agency regulations.
  • Tobacco or tobacco products;
  • Wood or wood products, including lumber which will not be processed, where the chemical manufacturer or importer can establish that the only hazard they pose to employees is the potential for flammability or combustibility (wood or wood products which have been treated with a hazardous chemical covered by this standard, and wood which may be subsequently sawed or cut, generating dust, are not exempted);
  • Articles; Note: Defined as a manufactured item other than a fluid or particle: (i) which is formed to a specific shape or design during manufacture; (ii) which has end use function(s) dependent in whole or in part upon its shape or design during end use; and (iii) which under normal conditions of use does not release more than very small quantities, e.g., minute or trace amounts of a hazardous chemical (as determined under paragraph (d) of this section), and does not pose a physical hazard or health risk to employees.
  • Food or alcoholic beverages which are sold, used, or prepared in a retail establishment (such as a grocery store, restaurant, or drinking place), and foods intended for personal consumption by employees while in the workplace;
  • Any drug, as that term is defined in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act when it is in solid, final form for direct administration to the patient (e.g., tablets or pills); drugs which are packaged by the chemical manufacturer for sale to consumers in a retail establishment (e.g., over-the-counter drugs); and drugs intended for personal consumption by employees while in the workplace (e.g., first aid supplies);
  • Cosmetics which are packaged for sale to consumers in a retail establishment, and cosmetics intended for personal consumption by employees while in the workplace;
  • Any consumer product or hazardous substance, as those terms are defined in the Consumer Product Safety Act and Federal Hazardous Substances Act, where the employer can show that it is used in the workplace for the purpose intended by the chemical manufacturer or importer of the product, and the use results in a duration and frequency of exposure which is not greater than the range of exposures that could reasonably be experienced by consumers when used for the purpose intended;
  • Nuisance particulates where the chemical manufacturer or importer can establish that they do not pose any physical or health hazard covered under this section;
  • Ionizing and nonionizing radiation; and
  • Biological hazards.

The standard does not require labeling of the following chemicals:

  • Any pesticide when subject to the labeling requirements of Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act and labeling regulations issued under that Act by the Environmental Protection Agency;
  • Any chemical substance or mixture that are subject to the labeling requirements the Toxic Substances Control Act and labeling regulations issued under that Act by the Environmental Protection Agency;
  • Any food, food additive, color additive, drug, cosmetic, or medical or veterinary device or product, including materials intended for use as ingredients in such products (e.g. flavors and fragrances), when they are subject to the labeling requirements under Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act  or the Virus-Serum-Toxin Act by either the Food and Drug Administration or the Department of Agriculture;
  • Any distilled spirits (beverage alcohols), wine, or malt beverage intended for nonindustrial use, when subject to the labeling requirements of Federal Alcohol Administration Act and labeling regulations issued under that Act by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives;
  • Any consumer product or hazardous substance when subject to a consumer product safety standard or labeling requirement of Consumer Product Safety Act and Federal Hazardous Substances Act or regulations issued under those Acts by the Consumer Product Safety Commission; and
  • Agricultural or vegetable seed treated with pesticides and labeled in accordance with the Federal Seed Act and the labeling regulations issued under that Act by the Department of Agriculture.

This standard applies to laboratories only as follows:

  • Employers shall ensure that labels on incoming containers of hazardous chemicals are not removed or defaced;
  • Employers shall maintain any safety data sheets that are received with incoming shipments of hazardous chemicals, and ensure that they are readily accessible during each workshift to laboratory employees when they are in their work areas;
  • Employers shall ensure that laboratory employees are provided information and training; and
  • Laboratory employers that ship hazardous chemicals are considered to be either a chemical manufacturer or a distributor under this rule, and thus must ensure that any containers of hazardous chemicals leaving the laboratory are correctly labeled and that a safety data sheet is provided to distributors and other employers per requirements of the standard.

This standard provides the requirements for a written hazard communication program, labels and other forms of warning, safety data sheets, information and training, trade secrets, hazard classification, chemical inventory, and non-routine tasks. The appendices for this standard cover the following: Appendix A provides the health hazard criteria; Appendix B provides the physical criteria; Appendix C provides the allocation of label elements; Appendix D provides the safety data sheets; Appendix E provides the definition of "trade secret"; and Appendix F pertains to the guidance for hazard classifications re: carcinogenicity. This standard also provides definitions such as: 

Chemical means any substance, or mixture of substances.

Hazard class means the nature of the physical or health hazards, e.g., flammable solid, carcinogen, oral acute toxicity.

Foreseeable emergency means any potential occurrence such as, but not limited to, equipment failure, rupture of containers, or failure of control equipment which could result in an uncontrolled release of a hazardous chemical into the workplace. 

Label means an appropriate group of written, printed or graphic information elements concerning a hazardous chemical that is affixed to, printed on, or attached to the immediate container of a hazardous chemical, or to the outside packaging.

Safety data sheet (SDS) means written or printed material concerning a hazardous chemical that is prepared in accordance with the standard.

Additional information can be found on the A-Z safety and health topic pages for hazard communicationpersonal protective equipmenteyewash stations and emergency showersorganic solventsacids and basesflammable liquidshierarchy of controls and respiratory protection.

Do your employees have occupational exposure to cadmium?

Do your employees have occupational exposure to cadmium?

If yes, then you need to comply with the cadmium standard. It applies to all occupational exposures to cadmium and cadmium compounds, in all forms, and in all industries covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Act, except the construction-related industries. This standard provides the permissible exposure limit (PEL) and the requirements for exposure monitoring, regulated areas, methods of compliance (i.e., engineering controls, work practice controls, written compliance program), respirator program (reference the respiratory protection standard), protective work clothing and equipment (reference the standard on eye and face protection), hygiene facilities and practices (reference the sanitation standard), hazard communication program (reference the hazard communication standard), housekeeping, signs and labels, medical surveillance, employee information and training, recordkeeping (reference the standard on access to employee exposure and medical records).

The appendices for cadmium are as follows: Appendix A provides the substance safety data sheet; Appendix B provides the substances technical guidelines for cadmium; Appendix D pertaining to occupational health history interview with reference to cadmium exposure; Appendix E provides cadmium in workplace atmospheres; and Appendix F pertains to nonmandatory protocol for biological monitoring. This standard also provides definitions such as:

Action level (AL) is defined as an airborne concentration of cadmium of 2.5 micrograms per cubic meter of air (2.5 ug/m(3)), calculated as an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA). 

High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter means a filter capable of trapping and retaining at least 99.97 percent of mono-dispersed particles of 0.3 micrometers in diameter. 

Additional related information can be found on the A-Z safety and health topic pages for personal protective equipmenthazard communicationhierarchy of controls and respiratory protection.

Do you receive containers or packages with DOT markings, placards or labels?

Do you receive containers or packages with DOT markings, placards or labels?

Do you receive containers or packages with DOT markings, placards or labels?

If yes, then you need to comply with the retention of DOT markings, placards and labels standard. It applies to the department of transportation markings, placards and labels for:

  • Packages of hazardous material received by the employer;
  • Freight containers;
  • Rail freight cars;
  • Motor vehicles;
  • Transport vehicles.

This standard provides the requirements pertaining to maintaining the visibility of markings, placards and labels, and maintaining labels in accordance with the hazard communication standard. 

Additional related information can be found on the A-Z safety and health topic page for hazard communication.