Arboriculture

Arboriculture

Hazard Overview

Hazard Overview

What is arboriculture?

Arboriculture is defined as the cultivation of trees, shrubs and other woody plants. Arboriculture includes, but is not limited to, propagating, transplanting, pruning, application of fertilizer and disease controlling chemicals, and removing trees. Arboriculture (NAICS 561730) is classified as general industry.

What are the hazards associated with arboriculture?

Some of the more serious hazards associated with arboriculture include injuries due to falling, electrocution due to contact with power distribution lines, and serious injuries or deaths due to being crushed by falling trees.

Is there a special emphasis program associated with this topic?

Occupational exposure to hazards encountered in arboriculture falls within the OSH Division logging and arboriculture special emphasis program.

Solutions

Solutions

What can I do to protect myself?

Be sure that there is proper clearance from nearby power lines before initiating cuts on trees. Your employer is required to provide employees with all necessary personal protective equipment such as, but not limited to, hardhats, gloves, chaps, hearing protection and fall protection equipment, prior to beginning work.

What resources are available to assist employers?

Safety and Health Programs

An arboriculture tree trimming policy, chain saw policy, a PPE hazard assessment and a first aid, CPR and AED policy are available and can be customized to fit the specific hazards and conditions in the work settings in which employees will work.

In addition, customizable programs including those for hearing conservation, bloodborne pathogens, hazard communicationelectrical safety, and respiratory protection can be modified to meet the employer's needs where applicable.

Training and Outreach Services

Presentations on hazard communication , walking and working surfaces, electrical safety, struck by/caught between and personal protective equipment can be used to assist employers with training requirements.

In addition, the education, training and technical assistance bureau provides free online safety and health training and outreach services (i.e., speaker's bureau requests, safety booths) upon request. Further, pre-recorded webinars can be used for employee training including hazard communication and walking-working surfaces.

Lastly, the NCDOL Library offers free safety and health videos (including streaming video services) and related research assistance on consensus standards (i.e., ANSI, NFPA, NEC).

A-Z Safety and Health Topics

More resource information can be found on the A-Z topics pages for hazard communication, noiseamputationsbloodborne pathogens, PPE, chain saw safety, electrical safety, walking and working surfaces, logging, aerial lifts and respiratory protection

Consultation Services

The consultative services bureau provides free and confidential onsite consultation regarding worksite safety and health hazards.

Regulations

Regulations

Which standards apply?

OSH has adopted the following standards which are applicable to arboriculture in North Carolina. Note: Please also check the standards information and activity webpage to see if there has been any recent or upcoming regulatory activity on this topic. 

General Industry

Other Applicable Standards

Lastly, the Which OSHA Standards Apply webpage can also help identify other standards that may be applicable to your worksite.

Learn More

Learn More

Where can I learn more?

Fact Sheets

Compliance Documents

Industry Guides

Technical Assistance

If you would like to receive interpretive guidance on this or any other OSH standard or topic, you can submit your questions using the Ask OSH web form, by e-mail to ask.osh@labor.nc.gov or by calling 919-707-7876.