Does "Subpart CC - Cranes and Derricks in Construction" Apply to You?

Subpart CC provides the requirements for cranes and derricks used in construction. Do your employees use cranes or derricks? If yes, then you need to comply with this subpart. According to the scope, this subpart applies to power-operated equipment, when used in construction, that can hoist, lower and horizontally move a suspended load. Such equipment includes, but is not limited to: Articulating cranes (such as knuckle-boom cranes); crawler cranes; floating cranes; cranes on barges; locomotive cranes; mobile cranes (such as wheel-mounted, rough-terrain, all-terrain, commercial truck-mounted, and boom truck cranes); multi-purpose machines when configured to hoist and lower (by means of a winch or hook) and horizontally move a suspended load; industrial cranes (such as carry-deck cranes); dedicated pile drivers; service/mechanic trucks with a hoisting device; a crane on a monorail; tower cranes (such as a fixed jib, i.e., "hammerhead boom"), luffing boom and self-erecting); pedestal cranes; portal cranes; overhead and gantry cranes; straddle cranes; sideboom cranes; derricks; and variations of such equipment. Note: This standard applies to equipment listed above when used with attachments. Such attachments, whether crane-attached or suspended include, but are not limited to: Hooks, magnets, grapples, clamshell buckets, orange peel buckets, concrete buckets, drag lines, personnel platforms, augers or drills and pile driving equipment.

This subpart does not cover:

  • Machinery (listed above) while it has been converted or adapted for a non-hoisting/lifting use. Such conversions/adaptations include, but are not limited to, power shovels, excavators and concrete pumps.
  • Power shovels, excavators, wheel loaders, backhoes, loader backhoes, track loaders. This machinery is also excluded when used with chains, slings or other rigging to lift suspended loads.
  • Automotive wreckers and tow trucks when used to clear wrecks and haul vehicles.
  • Digger derricks when used for augering holes for poles carrying electric or telecommunication lines, placing and removing the poles, and for handling associated materials for installation on, or removal from, the poles, or when used for any other work covered by the subpart on electric power transmission and distribution. Note: To be eligible for this exclusion, digger-derrick use in work subject to the electric power transmission and distribution subpart must comply with all of the provisions of that subpart, and digger-derrick use in construction work for telecommunication service must comply with telecommunications.
  • Machinery originally designed as vehicle-mounted aerial devices (for lifting personnel) and self-propelled elevating work platforms.
  • Telescopic/hydraulic gantry systems
  • Stacker cranes
  • Powered industrial trucks (forklifts), except when configured to hoist and lower (by means of a winch or hook) and horizontally move a suspended load.
  • Mechanic's truck with a hoisting device when used in activities related to equipment maintenance and repair.
  • Machinery that hoists by using a come-a-long or chainfall.
  • Dedicated drilling rigs
  • Gin poles when used for the erection of communication towers.
  • Tree trimming and tree removal work
  • Anchor handling or dredge-related operations with a vessel or barge using an affixed A-frame
  • Roustabouts
  • Helicopter cranes
  • Material delivery
    • Articulating/knuckle-boom truck cranes that deliver material to a construction site when used to transfer materials from the truck crane to the ground, without arranging the materials in a particular sequence for hoisting.
    • Articulating/knuckle-boom truck cranes that deliver material to a construction site when the crane is used to transfer building supply sheet goods or building supply packaged materials from the truck crane onto a structure, using a fork/cradle at the end of the boom, but only when the truck crane is equipped with a properly functioning automatic overload prevention device. Such sheet goods or packaged materials include, but are not limited to: Sheets of sheet rock, sheets of plywood, bags of cement, sheets or packages of roofing shingles, and rolls of roofing felt.

Note: The exclusion for material delivery does not apply when:

  • The articulating/knuckle-boom crane is used to hold, support or stabilize the material to facilitate a construction activity, such as holding material in place while it is attached to the structure;
  • The material being handled by the articulating/knuckle-boom crane is a prefabricated component. Such prefabricated components include, but are not limited to: Precast concrete members or panels, roof trusses (wooden, cold-formed metal, steel, or other material), prefabricated building sections such as, but not limited to: Floor panels, wall panels, roof panels, roof structures, or similar items;
  • The material being handled by the crane is a structural steel member (for example, steel joists, beams, columns, steel decking (bundled or unbundled) or a component of a systems-engineered metal building.

This subpart provides definitions applicable to the subpart, requirements for ground conditionsinspections (i.e., modified equipment, repaired/adjusted equipment, post-assembly, each shift, monthly, annual, severe service, not in regular use), wire rope - inspection, wire rope--selection and installation criteria, safety devices (i.e., crane level indicator, horn, proper operation), operational aids, operation (i.e., procedures, unattended vehicles, tag-out, storm warning, rated capacity, traveling with loads, counterweights, swinging locomotive cranes), authority to stop operationfall protection (i.e., boom walkways, steps, handholds, ladders, grabrails, guardrails, railings, anchorage, tower cranes, training), work area control (i.e., swing radius hazards), keeping clear of load, free fall and controlled load lowering, training, and severability.

Other requirements in this subpart that are applicable to cranes and derricks include standards on assembly and disassembly, powerline safety, signals and signalman, hoisting personnel, multiple lifts, equipment modifications, tower cranes, derricks, floating cranes/derricks, land cranes/derricks on barges,  overhead and gantry cranes, dedicated pile drivers, sideboom cranes, and equipment with a rated hoisting/lifting capacity of 2,000 pounds or less. Click on the tabs below to identify other applicable standards that may also apply.

Additional related information can be found on the A-Z safety and health topics page for cranes and derricks.

Subpart CC - Cranes and Derricks in Construction

Do your employees assemble or disassemble cranes or derricks?

Do your employees assemble or disassemble cranes or derricks?

If yes, then you need to comply with the requirements related to assembly and disassembly. These include assembly/disassembly--selection of manufacturer or employer procedures, assembly/disassembly--general requirements (applies to all assembly and disassembly operations), disassembly--additional requirements for dismantling of booms and jibs (applies to both the use of manufacturer procedures and employer procedures), and assembly/disassembly--employer procedures--general requirements.

Some key definitions to this subpart include:

Procedures include, but are not limited to: Instructions, diagrams, recommendations, warnings, specifications, protocols and limitations.

Unavailable procedures means procedures that are no longer available from the manufacturer, or have never been available, from the manufacturer.

Assembly/disassembly means the assembly and/or disassembly of equipment covered under this standard. With regard to tower cranes, "erecting and climbing" replaces the term "assembly," and "dismantling" replaces the term "disassembly." Regardless of whether the crane is initially erected to its full height or is climbed in stages, the process of increasing the height of the crane is an erection process.

Are your cranes or derricks used near power lines?

Are your cranes or derricks used near power lines?

If yes, then you need to comply with the standards related to power line safety. These include power line safety (up to 350 kV)--assembly and disassembly, power line safety (up to 350 kV)--equipment operations, power line safety (over 350 kV), power line safety (all voltages)--equipment operations closer than the Table A zone, and power line safety-while traveling under or near power lines with no load. You are also required to comply with the standard on training as it provides the training requirements for employees.

Some key definitions to this subpart include:

Assembly/disassembly means the assembly and/or disassembly of equipment covered under this standard. With regard to tower cranes, "erecting and climbing" replaces the term "assembly," and "dismantling" replaces the term "disassembly." Regardless of whether the crane is initially erected to its full height or is climbed in stages, the process of increasing the height of the crane is an erection process.

Electrical contact occurs when a person, object, or equipment makes contact or comes in close proximity with an energized conductor or equipment that allows the passage of current.

Power lines means electric transmission and distribution lines.

Are your operators qualified or certified?

Are your operators qualified or certified?

This should be a yes. The standard on operator qualification and certification provides that operators of equipment under this subpart be qualified or certified to operate the equipment. It includes requirements for operators-in-training, trainers, pre-qualification/certification training period, multiple lifts,, language and literacy requirements, and certificaiton criteria. Exception: Operator qualification or certification under this rule is not required for operators of derricks, sideboom cranes, or equipment with a maximum manufacturer-rated hoisting/lifting capacity of 2,000 pounds or less. You are also required to comply with the standard on training as it provides the training requirements for employees.

Some key definitions to this subpart include:

Qualified person means a person who, by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training and experience, successfully demonstrated the ability to solve/resolve problems relating to the subject matter, the work, or the project.

Sideboom crane means a track-type or wheel-type tractor having a boom mounted on the side of the tractor, used for lifting, lowering or transporting a load suspended on the load hook. The boom or hook can be lifted or lowered in a vertical direction only.
 

Are your signal persons qualified?

Are your signal persons qualified?

This should be a yes. The standard on signal person qualifications provide the qualification requirements for signal persons. These include:

You are also required to comply with the standard on training as it provides the training requirements for employees.

Are your maintenance and repair employees qualified?

Are your maintenance and repair employees qualified?

This should be a yes. The standard on qualifications of maintenance & repair employees provides the qualifications requirements for maintenance, inspection and repair personnel. These include:

  • Operate the equipment under the direct supervision of an operator who meets the requirements operator qualification and certification; or
  • Are familiar with the operation, limitations, characteristics and hazards associated with the type of equipment.
  • Maintenance and repair personnel must meet the definition of a qualified person with respect to the equipment and maintenance/repair tasks performed.

Qualified person means a person who, by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training and experience, successfully demonstrated the ability to solve/resolve problems relating to the subject matter, the work, or the project.

You are also required tocomply with the standard on training as it provides the training requirements for employees.

Are you hoisting employees?

Are you hoisting employees?

If yes, then you need to comply with the standard on hoisting personnel. It states that the use of equipment to hoist employees is prohibited except where the employer demonstrates that the erection, use, and dismantling of conventional means of reaching the work area, such as a personnel hoist, ladder, stairway, aerial lift, elevating work platform, or scaffold, would be more hazardous, or is not possible because of the project's structural design or worksite conditions. This standard does not apply to work covered by subpart R - steel erection.

It includes requirements for use of personnel platforms, equipment criteria (i.e., capacity of equipment, devices, controlled load lowering), personnel platform criteria, personnel platform landing, attachment and rigging, proof testing, work practices, environmental conditions,  fall protection, traveling, pre-lift meetings, hoisting personnel near power lines, hoisting personnel in drill shafts, hoisting personnel for driving operations, hoisting personnel for marine transfer, and hoisting personnel for storage-tank (steel or concrete), shaft and chimney operations.

Are your employees conducting multiple crane or derrick lifts?

Are your employees conducting multiple crane or derrick lifts?

If yes, then you need to also comply with the standard on multiple-crane/derrick lifts--supplemental requirements. It provides for the development of a plan by a qualified person, meeting the requirements of the subpart and the plan being directed by a competent person or qualified person.

Competent person means one who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to employees, and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them.

Qualified person means a person who, by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training and experience, successfully demonstrated the ability to solve/resolve problems relating to the subject matter, the work, or the project.

Do you have equipment that has a manufacturer-rated hoisting/lifting capacity of more than 2,000 pounds?

Do you have equipment that has a manufacturer-rated hoisting/lifting capacity of more than 2,000 pounds?

If yes, then you need to comply with the standard on design, construction and testing. It includes requirements related to rated capacity, latching hooks, cabs,  windows, and hydraulic load hoists.

Do you make equipment modifications or additions?

Do you make equipment modifications or additions?

If yes, then you need to comply with the standard on equipment modifications. It provides the requirements for obtaining manufacturer approval for modifications and/or additions, when the manufacturer is unavailable, multiple manufacturers, and manufacturer refusals.

Are your employees using tower cranes?

Are your employees using tower cranes?

If yes, then you need to comply with the tower cranes standard. It includes supplemental requirements for erecting, climbing, dismantling, signage, safety devices, operational aids, and inspections.

Tower crane is a type of lifting structure which utilizes a vertical mast or tower to support a working boom (jib) in an elevated position. Loads are suspended from the working boom. While the working boom may be of the fixed type (horizontal or angled) or have luffing capability, it can always rotate to swing loads, either by rotating on the top of the tower (top slewing) or by the rotation of the tower (bottom slewing). The tower base may be fixed in one location or ballasted and moveable between locations. Mobile cranes that are configured with luffing jib and/or tower attachments are not considered tower cranes under this subpart.

Are your employees using derricks?

Are your employees using derricks?

If yes, then you need to comply with the standard on derricks. It includes supplemental requirements for derricks, whether temporarily or permanently mounted. The standard provides operation procedures, general construction requirements, anchoring and guying, swingers and hoists, operational aids, post-assembly approval and testing, use of winch heads, secuing the boom, and inspections.

A derrick is powered equipment consisting of a mast or equivalent member that is held at or near the end by guys or braces, with or without a boom, and its hoisting mechanism. The mast/equivalent member and/or the load is moved by the hoisting mechanism (typically base-mounted) and operating ropes. Derricks include: A-frame, basket, breast, Chicago boom, gin pole (except gin poles used for erection of communication towers), guy, shearleg, stiffleg, and variations of such equipment.

Are your employees using floating cranes or derricks?

Are your employees using floating cranes or derricks?

If yes, then you need to comply with the standard on floating cranes/derricks and land cranes/derricks on barges. This standard provides supplemental requirements for floating cranes/derricks, unless specified otherwise. It provides general requirements such as work area control, additional safety devices, operational aids, accessibility of procedures applicable to equipment operation, inspections, manufacturer's specifications and limitations,.and load charts.

Are your employees using land cranes or derricks on barges or other means of floatation?

Are your employees using land cranes or derricks on barges or other means of floatation?

If yes, then you need to comply with the standard on floating cranes/derricks and land cranes/derricks on barges. This standard provides supplemental requirements for land cranes/derricks on barges, pontoons, vessels or other means of flotation (i.e., vessel/flotation device), unless specified otherwise. These requirements do not apply when using jacked barges when the jacks are deployed to the river, lake, or sea bed and the barge is fully supported by the jacks.

It provides general requirements such as work area control, additional safety devices, operational aids, accessibility of procedures applicable to equipment operation, inspections, manufacturer's specifications and limitations,.and rated capacity for equipment.

Are your employees using overhead or gantry cranes?

Are your employees using overhead or gantry cranes?

If yes, then you need to comply with the standard on overhead and gantry cranes. This standard applies to the following equipment when used in construction and not permanently installed in a facility: Overhead and gantry cranes, overhead/bridge cranes, semigantry, cantilever gantry, wall cranes, storage bridge cranes, launching gantry cranes, and similar equipment having the same fundamental characteristics, irrespective of whether it travels on tracks, wheels, or other means.

 

Are your employees using dedicated pile drivers?

Are your employees using dedicated pile drivers?

If yes, then you need to comply with the standard on dedicated pile drivers. The requirements of subpart CC apply to dedicated pile drivers, except:

  • Section operational aids (paragraph (d)(3)) -  Anti two-blocking device does not apply.
  • Section operational aids (paragraph (e)(4)) -  Load weighing and similar devices applies only to dedicated pile drivers manufactured after November 8, 2011.
  • For equipment manufactured on or after September 19, 2001, the following sections of ASME B30.2-2005 - see incorporated by reference apply: 2-1.3.1; 2-1.3.2; 2-1.4.1; 2-1.6; 2-1.7.2; 2-1.8.2; 2-1.9.1; 2-1.9.2; 2-1.11; 2-1.12.2; 2-1.13.7; 2-1.14.2; 2-1.14.3; 2-1.14.5; 2-1.15.; 2-2.2.2; 2-3.2.1.1. In addition, 2-3.5 applies, except in 2-3.5.1(b), "The control of hazardous energy (general industry)" is substituted for "ANSI Z244.1."
Are your employees using sideboom cranes?

Are your employees using sideboom cranes?

If yes, then you need to comply with the standard on sideboom cranes. It states that the requirements of this standard apply to sideboom cranes, except ground conditions, safety devices, operational aids, and operator qualification and certification. It also states that free fall and controlled load lowering applies, except equipment manufactured prior to October 31, 1984 [(a)(2)(i)]. Sideboom cranes in which the boom is designed to free fall (live boom) are permitted only if manufactured prior to November 8, 2010.

 

Are your employees using equipment with a rated hoisting/lifting capacity of 2,000 pounds or less?

Are your employees using equipment with a rated hoisting/lifting capacity of 2,000 pounds or less?

If yes, then you need to comply with the standard on equipment with a rated hoisting/lifting capacity of 2,000 pounds or less. It provides that the employer using this equipment must comply with the following requirements:

It provides requirements for assembly and disassembly, operation procedures, safety devices and operational aids, operator qualifications, signal person qualifications, inspections, hoisting personnel and design.