Does "Subpart Q - Concrete and Masonry Construction" Apply to You?

Subpart Q provides the standards for concrete and masonry construction operations. Are your employees engaged in concrete or masonry work? If yes, then subpart Q applies to you. Scope, application, and definitions applicable to this subpart includes key definitions such as:

Bull float means a tool used to spread out and smooth concrete.

The general requirements standard covers construction loads, reinforcing steel, post-tensioning operations, riding concrete buckets, working under loads, and personal protective equipment. The standard on requirements for equipment and tools covers bulk cement storage, concrete mixers, power concrete trowels, concrete pumping systems, concrete buggies, concrete buckets, tremies, masonry saws, and lockout/tagout procedures. Additional information can be found on the A-Z topics pages for personal protective equipmentsilica and lockout/tagout.

To identify what other standards within subpart Q may apply to your operations, click on the applicable tabs below.

 

Subpart Q - Concrete and Masonry Construction

Are your employees engaged in cast-in-place concrete operations?

Are your employees engaged in cast-in-place concrete operations?

If yes, then you will aslo need to comply with the standard requirements for cast-in-place concrete. This standard covers formwork, shoring and reshoring, vetical slip forms, reinforcing steel, and removal of formwork.  

Formwork means the total system of support for freshly placed or partially cured concrete, including the mold or sheeting (form) that is in contact with the concrete as well as all supporting members including shores, reshores, hardware, braces, and related hardware.

Vertical slip forms means forms which are jacked vertically during the placement of concrete.

Shore means a supporting member that resists a compressive force imposed by a load.

Reshoring means the construction operation in which shoring equipment (also called reshores or reshoring equipment) is placed, as the original forms and shores are removed, in order to support partially cured concrete and construction loads.

Are your employees engaged in precast concrete operations?

Are your employees engaged in precast concrete operations?

If yes, then you need to comply with the standard on requirements for precast concrete. It covers precast concrete wall units, structural framing, tilt-up wall panels, lifting inserts, lifting hardware, and employee location with respect to concrete members being lifted.

Precast concrete means concrete members (such as walls, panels, slabs, columns, and beams) which have been formed, cast, and cured prior to final placement in a structure.

Are your employees engaged in lift-slab operations?

Are your employees engaged in lift-slab operations?

If yes, then they need to comply with the standard on requirements for lift-slab operations. It covers design by a registered professional engineer (RPE), jacks/lifting units, jacking equipment, jacking opertions, leveling, load transfers, and locking and blocking devices.

Jacking operation means the task of lifting a slab (or group of slabs vertically from one location to another (e.g., from the casting location to a temporary (parked) location, or to its final location in the structure), during the construction of a building/structure where the lift-slab process is being used.

Lift slab means a method of concrete construction in which floor, and roof slabs are cast on or at ground level and, using jacks, lifted into position.

Are employees engaged in masonry work?

Are employees engaged in masonry work?

If yes, then you need to comply with the requirements for masonry construction. This standard provides the requirements related to limited access zones and bracing.

Limited access zone means an area alongside a masonry wall, which is under construction, and which is clearly demarcated to limit access by employees.